How People Spread the Word About the Climate March

100-Possible-Share-Graphic-FINALDid you ever wonder how they got over 25,000 to participate in the climate march on November 29, 2015? Well, the organizers succeeded to get hordes of people involved in order to send a strong and compelling message to Ottawa’s policymakers. Their belief was that if all those who were interested in the event told 10 people, and those who learned about the event told 5 more people who told 5 others, then approximately 250 people will be informed about it. That’s how grassroots organizing works and precisely how they met their goals, trumping oil companies with virtually unlimited budgets for advertising and PR.

They also launched Facebook campaigns that encouraged interested parties to RSVP to the event and then share it to their friends and contacts on Facebook.

The Availability of 100% POSSIBLE Visual Materials

The organizers also provided a style guide for those who wanted to create their own visual materials for the event. All the information needed to create an effective visual material was provided, from fonts to logos and colours. Below are examples of what was available then.

We-Can-Solve-Climate-Change

100% Possible Cover Photo

Workshops were also held in select venues in Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal, and Gatineau days before the march so interested individuals and groups can learn how to make their own placards and banners.

Call for Volunteers

Organizing the climate march was very challenging so the organizers had to rely on volunteers. They welcomed anyone willing to help out during the march as well as the day before the event. All volunteers had to do was complete and contact form and someone from the organizing team reached out to them.

100% Possible Climate March in Ottawa

100% Possible March in Ottawa - environmental protection

Do you know what happened in downtown Ottawa on November 29, 2015?

People gathered in downtown Ottawa on November 29, 2015 for a fun and friendly march at Parliament Hill. Attended by individuals, groups, and families, the event was held right before the UN Climate Summit in Paris, France. People were celebrating climate solutions and encouraged the Canadian government to be more proactive about climate change.

The march – 100% Possible: Marching for Climate Solutions and Justice – is just one of the many similar events organized around the globe that time. It was the flagship event in Canada and lasted for more than 3 hours at Parliament Hill, Ottawa’s seat of government.

100% Possible March in Ottawa - clean economy

Participants came all wearing green, the color that symbolizes renewable energy, hope, and the environment in general. Everyone got creative with what they wore to the event and there were flyers, banners, and posters all designed to encourage participation and collaboration for nature’s sake because a clean economy, especially in Canada, is 100% possible.

100% Possible March in Ottawa - Parliament Hill

The city of Ottawa, barely two hours from Montreal and about 4 hours from Toronto, is easy to get to. The event was well attended because buses were available to shuttle participants to and from Ottawa.  Due to the availability of transportation, more people signed up for the event, making it a huge success.

Global Warming – The Facts

Prove It – A Science Museum Exhibition Examining Climate Change

A London’s Science Museum exhibit examines the evidence behind the causes and effects of global climate change and the debates on its mitigation.

Despite great global efforts to prove human activity has made a significant impact on the climate change the world is experiencing, there are still those who doubt the validity of this fact. In the UK, where the government has taken a lead in pledging to combat global warming, a recent ICM poll showed a third of the country’s voters still believe global warming is mostly due to natural forces rather than human activity.

As a means of convincing the doubters, as well as informing those interested in climate change, London’s Science Museum has put together a summary of the evidence behind climate change. It has drawn on the knowledge of a range of experts, to give authoritative and timely insight into climate science and prediction, as well as the wider issues and debates arising from climate change.

For those unable to make it to the exhibition, the Prove It (sciencemuseum.org.uk) website provides access to this informative and engaging look at climate change.

The Science of Global Warming

Since the industrial revolution in the 1700s, typified by the widespread use of fossil fuels, global temperatures have made a leap of 0.75 degrees Celsius. This provided the first indication that human activity is linked to global warming. This exhibition gives a succinct summary of how scientists study climate change. Global temperature records dating back to 1659 have been used in conjunction with cutting-edge techniques to chart the rise of global temperatures. Using the clear link between the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global temperatures, trapped carbon dioxide in ice and fossilized pollen have helped build a picture of temperatures millions of years ago. The exhibition gives a clear explanation of how this data has been used to help build computer models to predict the future of climate change.

The Effects and Causes of Global Warming

Given the vast information on climate change, the exhibition does well to distill it down to the fundamental basics underlying climate change. The points made are backed up by examples which highlight the key causes and effects of climate change.

In simple terms, global warming is caused by solar radiation being trapped in the earth’s atmosphere by greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide and methane, rather than being reflected back into space. This radiation is then re-emitted to warm the earth’s surface. Human activity has caused a rise in the number of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Various examples of these activities are given as follows:

  • The burning of fossil fuels such as oil, coal, and gas gives off carbon dioxide.
  • Breeding livestock such as cows produces methane.
  • Rice fields produce methane when materials rot underwater.
  • Rotting rubbish at landfill sites produces methane.

The effects of climate change already being observed are also explained and include the following:

  • Changing rainfall patterns.
  • More common and intense extreme weather, such as droughts and hurricanes.
  • Rising sea levels.
  • Melting Arctic Ice.
  • Migration of species.

Fighting Global Warming

Fighting global warming has led to endless debates on what is the best course of action to take in order to mitigate future disasters. It is an area fraught with complexities but the exhibition neatly condenses the key arguments into a comprehensible summary.

The importance of rainforests, the effect on human rights, and what action needs to be taken to avoid reaching a tipping point are all covered. An up-to-date discussion of the impact climate change has on economic prosperity is particularly thought-provoking. Some economists have proposed that governments have a responsibility to invest in new green technologies. This would help mitigate the disastrous effects of climate change, while simultaneously supporting economies.

The recent Copenhagen Climate Change Conference was the largest concerted global effort to come up with a legally binding agreement to combat climate change. However, the talks encountered several stumbling blocks and its outcome fell far short of expectations.

The exhibition outlines the points of agreement and those of contention that arose at the conference. While it was agreed that the temperature rise since the industrial revolution should not be allowed to exceed two degrees Celsius, no specific targets were laid down. The need for developed countries to help poorer countries to adapt to and mitigate climate change was agreed to be of paramount importance.

Summary – Climate Change Exhibition

This exhibition provides a comprehensive guide to all the key issues relating to climate change. Not only is the evidence behind climate change given but the procedures scientists use to study climate change are explained. This adds to the weight of the evidence presented.

The effects, causes, and wider consequences are discussed as are the methods for mitigating against and adapting to climate change. An eye-opening account of the global efforts to fight global warming rounds up this fascinating and educative exhibition.

What is the Kyoto Protocol and Who Does it Apply To?

The Kyoto Protocol was agreed in 1997 in an attempt to curb greenhouse emissions. However, it doesn’t apply to all countries and has been widely criticised.

The Kyoto Protocol is an international agreement which became a legally binding treaty in 2005. It sets specific targets for industrialised nations to reduce carbon emissions by 2012 in an attempt to curb the effects of anthropogenic global warming.

It has been criticised for being both toothless and economically damaging; among the nations not to ratify it was Australia and the U.S (though Australia later backtracked in 2007), while China and India were exempt on account of being considered developing nations at the time the treaty was agreed. However, the Kyoto Protocol’s proponents argue that it is mankind’s best chance at avoiding the worst effects of climate change as a result of human activity.

What is the Kyoto Protocol?

The Kyoto Protocol was born out of the earlier treaty agreed at the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, known as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The UNFCCC was the first attempt by industrialised nations to monitor greenhouse emissions and curb carbon pollution. The ultimate goal was to find a way of stabilising levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases at a safe level that would mitigate against the worst effects of global warming.

The UNFCCC encouraged nations to reduce emissions but it was not legally binding; the Kyoto Protocol was the first treaty where formal targets were outlined. Industrialised nations were encouraged but not required to ratify the document; emissions caps applied only to those nations who did so. The overall target amounted to a reduction in carbon emissions of around 5% on 1990 levels taken as a four year average between 2008 and 2012.

Which Countries Signed the Kyoto Protocol?

As of November 2009, 191 states had ratified or otherwise approved the Kyoto Protocol, accounting for 63.7% of Annex I country emissions. Annexe I countries are a group defined by the UNFCCC, including all OECD countries and ‘economies in transition’. A full list of ratifying countries is published on the UNFCCC website.

In order for the Kyoto Protocol to become a legally binding document 55% of Annex I emissions needed to be accounted for by countries ratifying the treaty – a statistic which was achieved on 16th February 2005. As of 2010, the majority of outstanding emissions not covered by the Kyoto Protocol come from the United States, who between 1990 and 2005 accounted for 30% of global cumulative carbon emissions.

Criticism of the Kyoto Protocol

Various criticisms of the Kyoto Protocol have been made, ranging from accusations of inefficiency and inequality to suggestions that it is simply ineffective. One of the treaty’s highest-profile critics is James Hansen, who in 2009 boycotted the UN Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, labelling it a farce and claiming that the developed world nations were paying lip service to real environmental concerns and simply wanted to continue with ‘business as usual’.

Another major criticism was that caps were only applied to developed nations and that ‘developing’ countries, such as China, India and Brazil, were not included despite the fact that they represent a rapidly growing percentage of global carbon emissions – indeed, China is now the third highest producer of global greenhouse gases (8%) after the US (30%) and the EU (23%).

The Kyoto Protocol is an international treaty designed to curb greenhouse emissions among OECD countries and bring them down to 5% below 1990 levels by 2012. As of November 2009, it has been signed by 191 states and the US is the only major nation-state that has yet to ratify the agreement. It has been roundly criticised on a number of levels yet to date it remains the most important international agreement in the fight against anthropogenic global warming.

25,000 People Walk for Climate in Ottawa

Climate March Ottawa 2015

Applause was heard in our headquarters and in the crowd when we heard about the number of people enumerated in our march: 25,000 people * took to the streets of Ottawa today to spread our message for the climate! 

Some people have said that our march would not work, that people in Ottawa would not walk, that people in Montreal would not move, that Toronto was too far away and that climate issues would not be of interest to families and communities. workers.

Today, 25,000 people have proven that they are wrong: climate change is the moral issue of our century and the solutions to this crisis are becoming more evident and gaining popularity every day.

We know we can not do anything and watch climate change put our world at risk.

Corroborating the latest Nanos poll launched last week that said 73% of Canadians believe climate change is a threat to their economic future, the crowd was loud, flashy and loud to get their message across:

A 100% renewable economy by 2050 is 100% possible!

Scientists have said: we must do it. Some politicians have said: we CAN do it.

On the eve of the Climate Change Conference in Paris, Canadians joined the voices of citizens in more than 200 cities around the world calling for concrete actions to fight climate change.

There are moments when history is built, moments when the popularity of a message makes it so inevitable that even the most intransigent politicians are swept away by the wave.

Ottawa Climate March November 29, 2015

Today  could be one of those moments .

* About the crowd: Gilles Lamothe, professor of statistics at the University of Ottawa shared his methodology: He used the Jacob method to estimate the number of people on Parliament Hill. From a photo of the crowd, he estimated the area occupied by the crowd at 7,550 square meters and the density of the crowd at three people per square meter. With the march of error, he estimated that the number of people present was between 20 385 to 24 915, excluding the few thousand people left before the end of the march.

25,000 Beautiful People!

25,000 Beautiful People

A huge whoop just went up around the office and the crowd as the official crowd count came in.  25,000 people took to the streets in sub zero temperatures to join our positive call for climate solutions!

They said it couldn’t be done, that people in Ottawa wouldn’t march, that people in Montreal (who do march) wouldn’t make the trip, that Toronto was too far, that “environmental” issues wouldn’t attract workers, christians, students, families, and government workers.

Today 25,000 of us proved them wrong: climate change is the biggest moral issue of our times and the movement to solve it continues to grow each and every month. We know we can’t sit on the sidelines and let the climate crisis continue to unfold around us without doing something about it.

The movement’s strength in Canada is also supported by Friday’s poll released by Nanos research, which found 73 per cent of Canadians agree that “climate change presents a significant threat to our economic future”. The crowd today looked like a cross section of Canada.

Indigenous elders and frontline communities, small children grinning from strollers, teenagers chanting their hearts out, raging grannies, First Nations grandmothers and children, and so many others of all ages in colourful shades of green. Signs were equally split between French and English.

One last thing on the crowd count. Gilles Lamothe, statistician professor at the University of Ottawa, shared his methodology. He used Jacob’s method to estimate the number of people at the Hill. From a photograph, he estimated the surface area that was occupied by the crowd at about 7,550 square meters and also the density of the crowd at about 3 persons per square meter. With the margin of error, he estimated the number of people at the hill to be between 20,385 to 24,915, with a few thousand that left before the marched reached the Hill, 90 mins after the start.

25,000 Beautiful People March for Climate